For Estate Planning, Don’t Forget the Patent Estate (Part 2)

In my last blog we discussed the good news as to how a patent estate can be a real boon to estate planning.

To recap, patents are usually unvalued and hence a real challenge in family offices for estate planning. But used properly, patents and other IP assets can provide value for intergenerational changes in control and/or minimizing estate taxes. Here is a second case where Carthage Intellectual Capital Management (‘Carthage’) has proprietary processes to help family businesses and their tax and estate planning professionals.

Case 2- A family business with IP does not intend to transfer the business from a parent generation to successor generations. We will assume there are intellectual property (IP) assets (patents, trademarks, and copyrights are preferred) that confer substantial economic value to the business. An IP holding enterprise is formed to receive the IP and the license-back is created with the principal business. The IP holding enterprise may then be gifted to a family trust whose principal purpose is to maintain the IP assets, and receive and distribute back royalties to family members participating in the trust (other entities may be equally suitable but we call them a ‘trust’ as a generic description). In this case, the license back will depend on future occurrences as to when or how much royalty is paid as an annual rate for the license back itself. This in effect defers the need to value the IP assets at anything above the tax free gift basis at the time of gifting as there is not a fully defined income stream upon which to base an asset value.

If in the future the business is sold to a third party, a more substantial license royalty can be triggered as a consequence of the sale. The necessary use of the IP becomes a warranty obligation of the purchaser as the transferee of the license back. The sale price of the business may then consider the present value of the license back royalties payable to the trust. The selling family business can accept a lower effective sale price from  purchaser because the seller will be required to pick up the license back and make royalty payments triggered by the sale event. For the purchaser, the deductibility of the royalties is generally less that the borrowed capital and associated costs to acquire all assets in a fee simple transaction which can tolerate some purchase premium in a competitive bid situation.

The trust receives and distributes royalty income on a current basis and does not require a change in basis in the IP assets. The certainty of future royalty payments rests on the degree of risk of warranty default. If this is a low risk, it can allow the trust to borrow a principal sum based on the pledge of the continuing royalty income. This principal can be distributed to the trust beneficiaries tax free as an advance on future income. Running interest payments together with amortization of the IP transfer basis will offset future income taxes as a deductible trust expense. Alternately, the trust can sell off the IP assets and realize capital gains at that time for a distribution and liquidation of the trust itself.

Once again, Carthage has extensive experience and the patented processes that can guide family businesses through evaluation of their IP assets and the transactions that can satisfy their estate planning needs. Because these are sophisticated transactions, you will want to consult legal and accounting professionals to determine the suitability of IP for tax and estate planning purpose. But the good news is that Carthage will be there to help you when the time is right to unleash another hidden value of your IP. For another example, check my previous blog at www.carthageic.com.

For Estate Planning, Don’t Forget the Patent Estate (Part 1)

Lately, when I read about patents in the news, the focus is usually on mega companies and mega patent estates.  It’s true that about 80% of all US patents issue to large institutions and big businesses. But the 20% that’s left over still matters to the small businesses and inventors that own and use them. Taxes and estate planning are on the minds of many in this 20% category as the 2012 year winds down and the Bush tax cuts may be coming to an abrupt end. So it’s good news to know that a patent estate can be a real boon to estate planning.

Patents are usually unvalued and hence a real challenge in family offices for estate planning. But used properly, patents and other IP assets can provide value for both intergenerational changes in control and/or minimizing estate taxes. Here is the first of two cases where Carthage Intellectual Capital Management (‘Carthage’) has proprietary processes to help family businesses and their tax and estate planning professionals.

Case 1- Consider the family business where the next generation has taken management control of a business while the parent generation still owns a substantial portion of the business. If there are intellectual property (IP) assets (patents, trademarks, and copyrights are preferred), odds are good that they are unvalued even though they may confer substantial economic value to the business. If the IP assets are placed in a holding company, they can enter into a license back with the principal business for defined, time-based royalties to be paid back over the remaining economic life of the IP. This license-back allows for easy computation of a present value of the holding company. The stock of the IP holding company can then be exchanged with the business stock held by the parent generation in a tax free, ‘like kind’ exchange of property of equal value.

The royalties paid to the holding company can be distributed to provide an annuity income to the parent generation that now owns the IP holding company (and no longer owns the business). In turn the parent generation can, at its discretion, gift portions of the royalties to the next generation that may or may not be participants in the business. The royalty payments themselves are typically completely deductible to the back licensed business which lowers the total tax burden of the business. The back license itself is now an IP asset of a known transaction value that can be subsequently monetized by borrowings or subsequent sale and back-licensing. This latter option now increases the financial liquidity of the business by raising cash that reflects the IP asset value. Finally, the IP itself in the holding company is an amortizing asset, so over time, it dissipates to a zero or de minimis value for estate succession purposes. The amortization also acts to lower the net tax basis of the gross royalties.

Carthage has extensive experience and the patented processes that can guide family businesses through evaluation of their IP assets and the transactions that can satisfy their estate planning needs. To be sure these are sophisticated transactions and you will want to consult your professional service providers to determine the suitability of IP for tax and estate planning purpose. But the good news is that Carthage will be there to help you when the time is right to unleash another hidden value of your IP. For another example, check my next blog at www.carthageic.com.

Writing off a Business may be a Good Time to get Cash for your Patents

Last month Microsoft (NASDAQ MSFT) reported its first quarterly loss as a public company (7/19/2012).  As losses go it wasn’t much- US $492 Million for the quarter ending June 30, 2012. Of late Microsoft has been earning US $ 6 Billion per quarter. And with more than US $60 Billion in cash, MSFT isn’t going broke any time soon. What’s interesting about this story is that Microsoft wrote off more than US $6 billion in intangible assets. And if you’re any company other than Microsoft, there are some interesting opportunities to use those losses to showcase other intellectual properties you own. You might even be able to recover all of your losses.

In 2007 Microsoft bought a digital ad agency called aQuantive. Back then, companies like aQuantive were perceived as the digital evolution of Internet advertising. Microsoft wasn’t alone- Google, Yahoo and others seeking new revenue models for the Web were also in the hunt for acquisitions. Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) is what big successful companies do when their original business models mature and cease to grow. But there’s a problem with acquisitions- they fail to achieve results more often than they succeed. Don’t take my word for it-McKinsey & Company, a premier global management consulting firm, has been researching M&A activity for years. They empirically observed that 70% of acquisitions fail to meet their revenue targets. And more than a third under estimate the full cost of making the acquisition. (See “New McKinsey research challenges conventional M&A wisdom”, Strategy & Leadership, Vol. 32 Issue 2, pp.4 – 11.) In other words, the odds of success were never in Microsoft’s favor.

Most of the acquisition price of aQuantive was good will, which is one of the intangible asset classes where Carthage Intellectual Capital Management (CICM) provides client services. One of those client services is monetizing intellectual property when they have losses that can offset taxable gains. In the case of aQuantive, Microsoft decided the acquisition really did fail and eliminated $6.2 billion from its balance sheet. Specifically it took a loss of US $6.2 Billion in goodwill. In accounting terms it’s called ‘impairment’. Hypothetically speaking, what could have Microsoft sold at a profit to offset its impairment losses? The answer is- part of its own patent estate. Self invented patents are especially nice because essentially 100% of the selling price is a capital gain. So they constitute the least amount of property you must sell to use up the impairment loss. But what if Microsoft still needs to use those patents? The answer is- license-back the patents it sells. (Not familiar with patent sale license-backs? Check www.carthageic.com to learn more.)

Maybe Microsoft knows this already. I checked the July 19, 2012 8-K statement in which Microsoft officially summarized its business performance in the three months ending on June 30. The word ‘patent’ never appears.

Perhaps Microsoft patents aren’t worth US $6.2 Billion. So we also checked the 8-K and 10-K statements for the last five years (2008 to 2012). Microsoft spent more than US $44.7 Billion in R&D in that period and obtained more than 13.7 thousand US patents according to the USPTO. That averages about US $3.25 Million in R&D per issued US patent. Would Microsoft be dumb enough to spend $45 Billion to obtain zero patent values? Definitely not.

We roughly estimately that a portfolio sale of 2000-3000 patents would be more than enough to satisfy the most conservative of investors. Statistically you wouldn’t even need to very picky because the odds of not buying some highly valuable portfolio assets collectively equal to the portfolio purchase price is pretty close to zero. Especially when Microsoft would be the back-licensee of the portfolio.

But this isn’t about Microsoft- it’s about managing the risk and value of intangibles. And impairments. We are living in times of economic uncertainty- the kind of times that produce impairments from a multitude of calamities. Carthage understands business risk and intangible value. And while Microsoft may not need our help to recover its losses you may know someone who does.

What College Doesn’t Teach You about Sale License-Backs (But Should)

It’s summer intern season and Carthage Intellectual Capital is in full court press to get its share of the best and brightest.  As bright as they are, the sale license-back is completely unknown to interns. So here’s the primer we are using to get them engaged in the biggest financial revolution yet of the 21st century:

1. Suppose a company has 5 patents all of which are valid for 10 years. The patents originally cost the company $1000 in R&D.

2. Now suppose that Carthage (or a financing company licensed by Carthage) agrees to acquire all 5 patents for $1000. (How we figure this out relies on other patents under license to Carthage).

3, Carthage also agrees to license-back all of the patents to the company to use for 10 years in exchange for a royalty of $150 each year. This works out to $1500 for 10 years. (Again how we figure this out relies on other patents under license to Carthage).

4. Suppose the company has a tax rate of 40% on income only. Assume the $1000 it gets from Carthage is not taxed (more on this in future blogs). Carthage is organized like a partnership and pays no taxes.

5. The $150 the company pays as a royalty is an expense each year and reduces the income by $150. This reduces taxes payable by the company by 40% of $150/yr or $60/yr which is a tax credit and which is like getting cash refunds of $60/yr. ($600 for 10 years).

6. Now we can calculate how the sale license-back affects the company and Carthage over the 10 year agreement as follows:

                                                         Carthage                                         Company

Purchase Patents                             -$1000                                             +$1000

Pay Royalties                                   +$1500                                             – $1500

Tax Credits (40%)                            $   000                                            + $   600

Profits(+)/Losses(-)                        +$   500                                             +$   100

Carthage makes money because the royalties it receives are more than it paid for the patents (+$500). But the Company also makes $100 because its tax credits plus the sale price are more than the royalty payments. This the financial power of licensing versus borrowing.

Now suppose the company had decided to borrow $1000 for 10 years in exchange for paying back the principal of $1000 plus $500 in interest. It still gets $ 1000 but pays back $1500. What then?

The difference is in the tax credit. You only get a tax credit on interest paid on a loan, not the principal. The 40% tax credit on $500 in interest is $200. So instead of paying $1500 pay to the bank, the company pays $1300 net of tax credits which means it costs the company -$300 to borrow $1000 for 10 years. In our examples here licensing-back a $1000 patent pool is $400 cheaper than borrowing $1000. This part is not an invention of Carthage- it is the pre-existing rules of the IRS.

And this is what our interns will be explaining to our clients this summer. Perhaps they will have an opportunity to enlighten your interns as well.